Blaine Hoshizaki

No one else in the world is doing exactly this type and extent of research  

Professor Blaine Hoshizaki makes Globe and Mail’s list of top 50 most influential people in Canadian sports

The University of Ottawa congratulates Faculty of Health Sciences professor Blaine Hoshizaki for being named to the Globe and Mail’s 2012 Power 50 list of the most influential people in Canadian sport.

Professor Hoshizaki, PhD, is an associate professor at the School of Human Kinetics and the vice-dean (faculty affairs) at the Faculty of Health Sciences. He and his team of young scientists at uOttawa’s elite Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory are leading crash-test analyses to establish the relationship between helmet performance and how concussions occur.

In particular, they have recreated an impact similar to hockey superstar Sidney Crosby’s first massive blow to the head, which sidelined him for many months. According to Maclean's magazine: "No one else in the world is doing exactly this type and extent of research."

Professor Hoshizaki is now among the Globe’s Power 50 list of people with the influence, and the desire, to affect sport in Canada during the year.

Congratulations!
Consult the Globe’s Power 50 list

Update: February 2012

Professor Blaine Hoshizaki and his team of young scientists at the University of Ottawa's elite Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory are conducting crash-test analyses to establish the relationship between helmet performance and concussions.

In particular, they are reconstructing a hit similar to Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby’s first massive blow to the head, which has left him out of the game since early January 2011. According to Maclean's magazine "No one else in the world is doing exactly this type and extent of research."

Read the feature article and watch the video of the crash test on Macleans.ca.

Update: February 2011



Protecting our most valuable asset

For Dr. Blaine Hoshizaki, a fine mind has to start by protecting one’s head. Following a four-year study, the research team at uOttawa’s Neurotrauma Impact Laboratory led by Dr. Hoshizaki has developed a helmet that will help minimize concussions. This subtle and debilitating condition caused by a blow to the head can go undiagnosed in the midst of competition, as well as for many years afterwards.

“We were looking at ways to protect against what we call catastrophic hits, from skull fractures to intra-cranial bleeds,” said Dr. Hoshizaki, who is also the director and associate dean of the uOttawa School of Human Kinetics of the Faculty of Health Sciences.

The improved helmet design features 18 adaptive air cell shock absorbers that offer unparalleled three-dimensional protection against possible head trauma. The helmets were used by the 2009 University of Ottawa Gee-Gees football team. Several university and professional sports organizations, including the National Football League (NFL) are now using the technology.

Dr. Hoshizaki is working in partnership with the American firm Xenith to market the football helmets and tailor the technology to meet the specific needs of other contact sports such as hockey, lacrosse, downhill skiing and boxing.

Despite the challenges of developing a consumer product from academic research, Dr. Hoshizaki recognizes the considerable need within contact sports at all levels to protect our most valuable asset — our head.

By François Rochon
Published: January 2010

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Last updated: 2012.11.27