Programs

Finding the perfect program of study is not always easy. That’s why it’s good to check out the various options available to you. If you are interested in a non-Indigenous program, check out the hundreds of Undergraduate and Graduate and Postdoctoral programs offered at the University.

Alternative admission options for Indigenous students

The University of Ottawa is committed to increasing access to postsecondary education for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit learners. This commitment includes offering alternative admission options for Indigenous students in selected programs including the Faculty of Education, Health Sciences, Law and Medicine.

Faculty of Education

Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) - Certificate/B.Ed. (Primary/Junior)

The Faculty offers a three-year community-based Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) at the Primary/Junior level that leads to the Baccalaureate in Education or the Certificate in Aboriginal Teacher Education.

What you will need:

To be eligible for consideration, applicants must:

  1. have completed at least a three-year undergraduate degree at a recognized university, or the equivalent in a foreign country, prior to July 2016;
  2. be of Aboriginal ancestry;
  3. demonstrate proficiency in a Native language
  4. have acquired relevant experience and skills.

Deadline: December 1, 2016

For more information visit the Aboriginal Teacher Education website or the Teacher Education Application Service (TEAS) website.

Faculty of Health Sciences

Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing for Registered Nurses (BScN)

To apply for the uOttawa nursing program, submit your application to the Ontario Universities Application Centre (OUAC) website and indicate that you would like to apply as an Aboriginal candidate, making sure to provide the following additional documentation:

  • A letter declaring your Aboriginal ancestry and providing specific information about your First Nation, Treaty, community or organizational affiliation. The letter should expand on your academic and personal background, as well as explain your connection to an Aboriginal community and your reasons for wanting to become a registered nurse.
  • A letter of reference from your First Nation, Inuit or Métis band council, tribal council, treaty authorities or community or organizational affiliates.
  • Proof of Aboriginal ancestry. This proof can be:
    • Copy of a Certificate of Indian Status;
    • Copy of a Certificate of Indian Status of mother or father;
    • Letter from home community's band council confirming membership;
    • Copy of Métis Nation card;
    • Copy of Inuit Beneficiary Card;
    • Letter from Indigenous and Northern Affairs confirming Indian Status (for Bill C-31 applicants).

In the absence of any of the above, a letter from the applicant, explaining their ancestry and why the submission of one of the above documents is impossible, is acceptable.

Deadline:  April 1, 2016.

For more information, please see the School of Nursing Aboriginal Students Recruitment and Retention Initiative website.

Faculty of Law

Common Law Section

Persons of Aboriginal ancestry, and First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples, may apply as either General or Specific category applicants. As Specific category applicants, persons of Aboriginal ancestry who meet the Mature category requirements may apply under both the Mature and Aboriginal categories. The Admissions Committee may admit applicants in the Aboriginal category unconditionally or subject to successful completion of the Program of Legal Studies for Native People.

What you will need:

  • A personal statement (as part of the online application)
  • Two letters of reference (with at least one from an academic source)
  • Official transcripts from all postsecondary educational institutions you have attended
  • An up-to-date resumé/CV.
  • Proof of Indigenous ancestry (copy of Certificate of Indian Status, Certificate of Indian Status of mother or father, Métis Nation card or Inuit Beneficiary Card, or letter from home community’s band council confirming membership, or from Indigenous and Northern Affairs confirming Indian Status).

Deadline: November 1, 2016

For more information, visit the First-year Applicants — Aboriginal Applicants website.

Faculty of Medicine

Undergraduate Medical Education (MD)

The Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa has established a dedicated admission process for candidates of Indigenous ancestry as part of its mission to improve access to better healthcare for First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples, and to better serve society’s needs.

First Nation, Inuit and Métis candidates who meet the stipulated admission eligibility requirements for the UGME program will compete for a designated number of admission spots. Currently, up to seven spots are reserved through this admission process. Admission bursaries and other financial assistance may be available for successful applicants, depending their needs. We invite you to self-identify as First Nation, Inuit or Métis when you fill out your admission application.

What you will need:

  • A statement that includes: a declaration of Indigenous ancestry; a request for consideration under the alternate admissions process; details on your academic and personal background; an explanation of your reasons and motivation for wanting to become a physician.
  • A letter of recommendation from your First Nation, band council, tribal council, or Indigenous community or organizational affiliation.
  • Official transcripts of all required academic documents.
  • Proof of Indigenous ancestry (copy of Certificate of Indian Status, Certificate of Indian Status of mother or father, Métis Nation card or Inuit Beneficiary Card, or letter from home community’s band council confirming membership or from Indigenous and Northern Affairs confirming Indian Status).

Deadline: September 15, 2016

For more information: Ontario Medical Schools Application Service (OMSAS) or University of Ottawa Indigenous Program websites.

Academic Programs with Indigenous Content

In addition to the alternative admissions options for Indigenous students in the faculties of Common Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Education, there are also a number of courses focussed on Aboriginal peoples, including the major and minor in Aboriginal Studies, which are offered through the Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Studies.

Programs on Aboriginal Peoples

Aboriginal Law and Indigenous Legal Traditions

The Faculty of Law offers an Aboriginal Law and Indigenous Legal Traditions Option for current JD (law) students interested in gaining in-depth and practical experience in contemporary Aboriginal law, as well as Indigenous legal traditions.

Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Studies

The Faculty of Arts offers both a major and minor in Aboriginal Studies. The program explores the complex socio-cultural history of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people throughout Canada, from pre-contact to contemporary Aboriginal communities.

Courses with Indigenous Content

Faculty of Arts

Department of Classics and Religious Studies

Department of Geography

Department of History

Department of Linguistics

Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Studies

Faculty of Education

Faculty of Law

Civil Law Section

Common Law Section

Faculty of Social Sciences

Department of Criminology

Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies

School of Political Studies

School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies

Human Rights Research and Education Centre

If you have any questions concerning programs of study available at the University of Ottawa, contact the Aboriginal Outreach Officer.

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