Anthony Bella

E-Card

Anthony Bella
Assistant Professor

Room: B3 Urology, Civic
Office: 613-761-4500
Work E-mail: abella@ohri.ca

Anthony Bella

Biography

Clinical Investigator, Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Surgeon, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, The Ottawa Hospital

Assistant Professor and Director of Basic Urological Research, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

Greta and John Hansen Chair in Men's Health Research

Research

The ultimate goal of Dr. Bella's research is to develop novel approaches to prevent or repair the nerve damage that can occur during treatments for prostate cancer. His laboratory focuses on the neurobiology of cavernous nerve response to injury, with emphasis on molecular mechanisms involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. His research also has implications for the repair and regeneration of other types of nerves.

Prior to Dr. Bella's recruitment to the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, he trained at the University of Western Ontario (Lawson Research Institute under Dr. Gerald B Brock) and as a post-doctoral fellow under Dr. Tom F Lue at the University of California San Francisco where he made significant strides delineating the molecular mechanisms of cavernous nerve regeneration and applied this knowledge to pursue new strategies for peripheral nerve neuromodulation after injury. Dr. Bella's research is comprised of four main streams: neurotrophins, identification and evaluation of novel neuromodulators, use of novel strategies to promote nerve protection and/or regeneration, and the use of adipose-derived stem cells to optimize injury response.

Key Words:

cavernous nerve injury, prostate cancer, nerve protection, nerve regeneration, erectile dysfunction, animal model

Fields of Interest

  • to develop novel approaches to prevent or repair the nerve damage that can occur during treatments for prostate cancer
  • to focus on the neurobiology of cavernous nerve response to injury, with emphasis on molecular mechanisms involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration.
Back to top