Bernard J. Jasmin

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Bernard J. Jasmin
Full Professor

Ph.D. - Université de Montréal (1989)
B.Ed. - McGill University (1983)

Room: Rm. 3153 RGN
Office: 613-562-5800 ext. 8383
Work E-mail: jasmin@uottawa

Bernard Jasmin

Biography

Research Interests:

I am interested in the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly, maintenance and plasticity of synapses. In this context, the vertebrate neuromuscular synapse provides an ideal system with which to decipher the basic mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, trans-synaptic regulation and cell-cell interactions. Studies in the laboratory focus particularly on: i) the molecular signals involved in the regulation of genes encoding synaptic proteins; ii) the role of cytoskeletal elements in the organization of distinct membrane and cytoplasmic domains; and iii) the plasticity of these cellular and molecular events throughout development and in the adult. To address these issues, several in vivo models leading to acute and chronic alterations in the levels of neuromuscular activation are used as well as in vitro systems involving cultures of muscle cells subjected to various experimental treatments. Molecular biological techniques such as genomic cloning, nuclear run-on, gel-shift assays, in situ hybridization, quantitative RT-PCR at the single cell level, as well as antisense and transgenic technologies are routinely used. These experiments are complemented by cell biological techniques that include immunocytochemical, histochemical and biochemical assays. In addition, we have recently begun to examine the regulation of synaptic proteins in neurons in attempts to determine whether the same regulatory mechanisms operate in different cell types.

Keywords:

transcriptional regulation, mRNA stability, translational control, RNA-binding proteins, Duhenne muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, muscle atrophy

Fields of Interest

  • The basic mechanisms involved in regulating gene and protein expression at the neuromuscular synapse with an emphasis on gene products that are relevant to several neuromuscular diseases and conditions.
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