Governance

Yukon

Governance

John Streicker is the Minister responsible for the French Language Services Directorate for the Yukon. He is also the Minister of Community Services and the Minister responsible for Yukon Liquor Corporation and for Yukon Lottery Commission.

The French Language Services Directorate supports the departments and crown corporations in the implementation of the Languages Act, by offering advice on the planning and delivery of French services, managing contribution agreements with the federal government and offering translation, revision and coordination services for the French sections of the websites[1].

The Advisory Committee on French Language Services is composed of nine (9) members appointed by the Cabinet. These members represent the Francophone community, the Yukon Employees Union and the provincial government. The Committee’s role is to advise the Minister responsible for the French Language Services Directorate and ensure liaison with the Yukon’s Francophone community.

There is also a sub-committee on French Services within the Deputy Ministers Review Committee[2].


[1] Government of Yukon, French Language Services Directorate, About us. Page consulted online on November 2, 2016.

[2] Government of Yukon, French Language Services Directorate, Yukon French Language Services Highlights. Page consulted online on November 2, 2016.

Overview of the Laws, Policies and Regulations

The purpose of the Languages Act is to recognize French and increase services in this language and to recognize the importance of Aboriginal languages in the province placing particular emphasis on preserving, enhancing and developing them. The use of English, French or an Aboriginal language is permitted in the debates and proceedings of the Legislative Assembly. Laws and regulations are published in English and French and the use of these two languages is permitted before the courts as established by the Legislative Assembly.

Under the Act, any member of the public in the Yukon has the right to communicate with, and to receive available services from, any head or central office of an institution of the Legislative Assembly or of the Government of the Yukon in English or French. Other offices also have linguistic obligations in terms of communication and the delivery of services to the public if there is a significant demand for communications with and services from that office in both English and French or are justified by the nature of the office.

The French Language Policy came into effect in 1994 and was revised in 2012. The Policy applies to government agencies. It reiterates several of the elements in the Languages Act and presents principles for guiding the delivery of French services. Among other things, it addresses issues such as consulting the Francophone community on needs and priorities and the quality of services offered. It also sets out the roles and responsibilities of institutions in terms of French services. It declares that the administrative language of work in the Yukon public service is English.

Back to top