Two tourists with backpacks next to the water

About the Event

Citizen science refers to efforts to promote the participation of the general public in scientific research. The discussion will center on questions of values in the context of citizen science. By thinking about citizen science as collaboration across knowledge communities, we can break down a problematic dichotomy between social and rational, and better understand scientific objectivity.

Dr. Monica Gattinger

Dr. Monica Gattinger

Opening Remarks

Director of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy, Professor at the School of Political Studies and Founder/Chair of Positive Energy, University of Ottawa

Dr. Gattinger is an award-winning researcher and highly sought-after speaker, strategic adviser and media commentator in the energy and arts/cultural policy sectors. Her innovative research programme convenes business, government, Indigenous, civil society and academic leaders to address complex policy, regulatory and governance challenges. Gattinger is Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, board member of the Clean Resource Innovation Network, and serves on advisory committees for the National Research Council Canada, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, the Ontario Energy Board, the Ottawa Science Policy Network, the University of Calgary and Women in Nuclear Canada. She Chairs the Council of Canadian Academies’ expert panel on International Science and Technology Partnerships and is a member of the Government of Ontario’s Electrification and Energy Transition Panel. Monica is a columnist for JWN Energy’s Daily Oil Bulletin and she received the 2020 Clean50 Award for her thought leadership in the energy sector. She holds a PhD in public policy from Carleton University.

Dr. Michael Hawes

Dr. Michael Hawes

Opening Remarks

President and Chief Executive Officer at the Foundation for Educational Exchange between Canada and the United States of America - Fulbright Canada

Dr. Michael Hawes is President and Chief Executive Officer at the Foundation for Educational Exchange between Canada and the United States of America (aka Fulbright Canada). He oversees the organization’s strategic vision, partnership development, operations, and programs. He is a professor of political science, a tireless advocate for international education, and a proud alumnus of the Fulbright program, having taken up distinguished chairs at the University of California at Berkeley and the USC Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism.

Michael holds a Ph.D. in political science from York University in Toronto, an M.A. in international affairs from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University, and a B.A.H in economics and history from the University of Toronto. He has published widely on foreign policy, political culture, international economic relations, Canadian foreign policy, and related subjects. His most recent books include 1968 in Canada: A Year and its Legacies (University of Ottawa Press, 2021), Canada’s Public Diplomacy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), and Canadian Foreign Policy in a Unipolar World (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Michael taught international relations and foreign policy in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University for many years. He has also held visiting appointments at the Instituto Technologico Autonomo de Mexico in Mexico City, Tsukuba University in Japan, the International University of Japan, the University of British Columbia, and the Swedish Institute for International Affairs. He has sat on several national boards and ministerial advisory boards. He also co-convenes the Canada Colloquium Series at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Michael was awarded the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters (Honoris Causa) from the State University of New York and Doctor of Letters (Honoris Causa) from Vancouver Island University

Dr. Aleta Quinn

Dr. Aleta Quinn

Keynote Speaker

Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Idaho
ISSP's 2024 Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Science & Society

Aleta Quinn, Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Science and Society, researches the relationships among science, social values, and objectivity. Views that separate the domains of science from social policy and social values are no longer tenable. New understandings are needed to clarify the ways in which value-questions relate to scientific questions. In particular, Quinn’s research focuses on the sciences that concern biodiversity, and on distinct forms of citizen-science.

Quinn comes to us from the University of Idaho, where she is Associate Professor of Philosophy. She holds a PhD in history and philosophy of science from the University of Pittsburgh, and a BA in philosophy and BS in biology from the University of Maryland. Her previous positions include fellowships at the Smithsonian Institution, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Studies, and California Institute of Technology.

Her most recent project applies existing models of objectivity in science, developed by philosophers of science, to case studies in citizen science. The application reveals challenges, suggesting that the existing models must be adapted or replaced. The models of objectivity conceive of science as a social enterprise, breaking down a problematic dichotomy between social and rational; yet they do not sufficiently scrutinize the concept of a unified community of science that can readily be distinguished from communities external to science.

Dr. Jennie Day

Dr. Jennie Day

Moderator

Postdoctoral Fellow, Canadian Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Ethical Design Lab, Centre for Law, Technology and Society, University of Ottawa, Mitacs Accelerate Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Dr Jennie Day is an interdisciplinary social scientist working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Canadian Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Ethical Design Lab (CRAiEDL) with Dr. Jason Millar.

Her current research explores the future visions of technology emergence held by engineers developing AI-assisted ageing-in-place technologies for older adults. The project’s purpose is to constructively shape the ethical design, development and deployment of these technologies in practice through the creation of bottom-up ethical frameworks and values-based ‘ethical engineering design requirements’.

Jennie completed her PhD at Newcastle University in the UK, where she examined the politics of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and sociodigital futures through the prism of autonomous vehicle (AV) emergence. Her research explores critical questions about the material power of AI imaginaries, algorithmic power and injustice, technological ontologies, democratic conceptions of the ‘public interest’, technological solutionism, and governance of sociodigital futures. 

Accessibility
If you require accommodation, please contact the event host as soon as possible.
Date and time
Feb 27, 2024
12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Format and location
In person, Virtual
Social Sciences Building (FSS)
Language
English
Audience
Graduate students, Faculty and staff, Researchers, General public
Organized by
Institute for Science, Society and Policy