Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Admission

What should I do before submitting my application?

To prepare for admission, you should first pick a program that you want to study. Take a look at the Programs section for ideas. You can also visit the campus or attend an information session. Visit the Admission section for more information.

What do I need to submit my application?

Visit the University of Ottawa Registrar’s webpage to learn more about what documents are required for undergraduate admissions and for graduate/doctoral admissions. You may also need to complete an Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC) application, which gives you the opportunity to self-declare your Indigenous identity (i.e., you can select if you are First Nation (status or non-status), Métis or Inuit). For more information, visit the Admission section.

What should I do after submitting my application?

Think ahead! If you receive an offer of admission, you may be eligible for scholarships and /or sponsorship from your community. You may also want to look into living in residence on campus or living off-campus. Check the Admission section to learn more about how to get ready for your first year, and check the Community and Opportunities section for information on Indigenous community support and the programs that are available to you.

Programs

Does the University of Ottawa have alternative admissions programs for Indigenous students?

Yes. There are alternative admission options for selected programs in the faculties of Education, Health Sciences, Common Law, and Medicine. For more information, visit the Programs section.

Are there programs on Indigenous culture or people?

Yes. The Aboriginal Law and Indigenous Legal Traditions program at the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section and the Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Studies at the Faculty of Arts both offer programs that feature insights into Indigenous cultures and peoples. Visit the Programs section for more information.

Are there programs for Indigenous students?

Yes. The Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) at the Faculty of Education is specifically designed for Indigenous students. Visit the Programs section for more information.

Are there any courses with Indigenous content?

Yes. Five faculties offer courses relating to Indigenous cultures or peoples in various departments. Visit the Programs section for a list of all courses featuring Indigenous-related content.

Financial Aid

Am I eligible for sponsorship or funding?

If you are a First Nations, Métis, or Inuit student, you may be eligible for sponsorship or funding opportunities. Find out more in the Financial Aid section.

Does the University of Ottawa offer scholarships for Indigenous students?

Yes. Many scholarships and bursaries are offered to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit students, including prestigious admission scholarships. Visit the Financial Aid section to learn more.

Self-Identification

How do I declare my ancestry?

You have two options:

  • Option 1: You can indicate your “Aboriginal” status in your OUAC online application.
  • Option 2: You can register with the Aboriginal Resource Centre (ARC) once you have been admitted to the University of Ottawa.

For more information, visit the Self-Identification section.

Services and Resources

What is the AEC?

AEC stands for the Aboriginal Education Council. It serves as a resource for all matters relating to Indigenous education at the University of Ottawa. To learn more about the AEC, visit the Services and Resources section.

What is the ARC?

ARC stands for Aboriginal Resource Centre. This is a free service that provides support and tools to meet the personal, professional and academic needs of all First Nations, Métis, and Inuit students. To learn more about this service, visit the Services and Resources section.

What is the Career Development Centre?

The Career Development Centre, or CDC, offers various services and resources in career development to help you identify and enhance the job skills you need to succeed in today's workplace. The CDC can provide you with career counselling, job search tools, as well as answers to “What can I do with my studies?”. To learn more about the CDC, visit the Services and Resources section.

What is CO-OP?

Co-operative education at the University of Ottawa allows you to apply concepts learned in class during paid work terms. The program provides you with approximately 16 months of experience in your field of study, allowing you to build a network of valuable contacts, and is noted on your degree, all of which can greatly contribute to helping you find a job more easily after graduation. To learn more about CO-OP programs, visit the Services and Resources section.

How can I learn about international exchange opportunities?

The purpose of the international exchange program is to allow full-time students to study at a partner university elsewhere in the world without paying international student fees. Students gain a new perspective during their academic experience by spending one or two sessions at a one of our more than 250 partner institutions in some 52 countries. To learn more about the international exchange program, visit the Services and Resources section.

What is the SASS?

SASS stands for the Student Academic Success Service. This free network of services and programs is designed to support all students throughout their academic career. To learn more about this service, visit the Services and Resources section.

Convocation

Is there a special ceremony for Indigenous students?

Yes. The Indigenous Graduates Honouring Ceremony takes place at the end of every academic year. To find out more, visit the Convocation section.

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