uOttawa takes quantum research to the next level

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RESEARCH + INNOVATION
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Building on over 20 years of expertise, the University of Ottawa brings quantum research on its campus to the next level by consolidating its researchers’ talents and skills to create an institute in quantum technologies to build on its research expertise in materials science and photonics – the science that examines the interaction between light and matter.

Under the name NexQT (Nexus for Quantum Technologies), the institute will support innovation and commercialization initiatives, including quantum imaging, sensors, computing and devices, and real-life applications in everything from secure communication to medicine.

This is the second major development in the area of quantum technologies for uOttawa in a matter of weeks. In mid-June, the university announced a partnership with Toronto-based Xanadu Quantum Technologies to advance the development of quantum computing technologies in Canada.

Dr. Ebrahim Karimi
QUANTUM RESEARCH

“uOttawa is recognized as a major research and innovation hub in quantum photonics, this new institute and our partnerships (...) will mean our quantum research capabilities are among the world's best.”

Dr. Ebrahim Karimi

— Canada Research Chair in Structured Quantum Waves & member of the Department of Physics

The new institute is being co-directed by Dr. Ebrahim Karimi, Canada Research Chair in Structured Quantum Waves, and member of the Department of Physics and the Max Planck Centre for Extreme and Quantum Photonics; and Dr. Elena Baranova, a professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering.

“The University of Ottawa is already recognized as a major research and innovation hub in quantum photonics,” said Karimi. “This new institute and our partnerships with industry leaders like Xanadu and other research centres like the National Research Council and Germany’s Max Plank Institute will mean Ottawa’s quantum research capabilities are among the best in the world.”

Said Baranova, “I’m delighted to have been asked to take on this leadership role. The institute will bring together more than 300 students and postdoctoral fellows and some 80 researchers in the fields of engineering, science, law and medicine. This multi-disciplinary team is bound to find innovative approaches to training the next generation of talent and to building on our successes. These are exciting times.”

Dr. Elena Baranova
QUANTUM RESEARCH

“This multi-disciplinary team is bound to find innovative approaches to training the next generation of talent and to building on our successes. These are exciting times.”

Dr. Elena Baranova

— Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

uOttawa’s Vice-President of Research and Innovation Sylvain Charbonneau said the creation of NextQT is in line with the vision uOttawa has been embracing for the last decades in quantum research.

“Our efforts have always been toward harnessing the research talent in the early phase of quantum technology related applications. We put this into motion way back in 2002 with our early investments to set up the Centre for Research in Photonics. This led to the creation of globally significant nodes of research excellence, bringing top talent and ideas to the university. The strong partnership with the Max-Planck Society which led to the creation of the uOttawa-Max-Planck Centre for Extreme and Quantum Photonics, and the Joint Research Centre with the National Research Council Canada are two primary examples of such national and international leadership showed by uOttawa in this key area of research.”

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