Understanding university fees

Understanding university fees

Tuition fees are mandatory fees charged by the University for education and instruction. They vary according to your student status (full or part time), level of study (undergraduate or graduate), program and legal status in Canada. This site has the tools you need to estimate and understand your tuition fees and other required fees at uOttawa.
Fees for the coming academic year (September to August) are posted in late May.

See the fees for the 2021–2022 and 2022–2023 academic years. To see tuition fees for terms prior to fall 2021, see our fee archives.

You can find the final amount of your invoice in your statement of account, available in uoZone once you enrol.

Estimating your total university fees for a year

An academic year is normally eight months (two terms, September to April) for a bachelor’s and 12 months (three terms, September to August) for a graduate degree. In most cases, the academic year starts the first week of September. However, some people start their studies in January or May.

To estimate your fees, follow these steps.

  1. Go one term at a time using the information in the tables on the “Tuition fees,” “Ancillary fees” and “Incidental fees” pages.
  2. For each term:
    • Follow the instructions for each fee table.
    • Generally, there’s a flat fee if you study full time, while if you study part time, fees are calculated by unit (credit). However, for some programs, such as the master’s in engineering, fees are calculated by unit, even if you study full time.
      • If there’s a flat fee for your program, you’ll get an estimate.
      • If your fees are calculated by unit, multiply the amount per unit by the number of units you’ll be taking.
    • Add the ancillary fees that apply to your student status (full or part time) and level of study (undergraduate or graduate).

Add the incidental fees that apply to any of your courses as necessary.

Factors affecting tuition fees

Many factors affect your tuition fees:

  1. Level of study, discipline and program
  2. Student status (regular or special student)
  3. Course load
  4. Status in Canada
  5. Province or territory of residence (for Canadians)
  6. Progress in your program

Level of study, discipline and program

There are three levels of study at the University: bachelor’s or certificate, master’s or graduate diploma, and doctorate.

Once you’ve chosen a level of study, your first discipline within your program determines your tuition fees. For example, if you’re studying in the Honours Bachelor of Arts in Communication with a minor in biology, your first discipline is Communication. If you’re doing a double degree or a joint honours degree, choose the option that includes both disciplines. If you don’t see your program combination in the list, check the fees for each discipline separately.

See our programs of study.

Fees for qualifying programs

If you don’t have the prerequisite courses for a graduate program, you may be able to try a qualifying program.

Qualifying programs prepare you and give you the knowledge you need to be admitted. You can take them either full or part time.

University fees (including incidental fees and ancillary fees) are the same as for graduate studies. They’re based on your student status (full or part time), faculty, total number of terms and legal status in Canada (Canadian or international student).

Whether your qualifying program leads to a master’s or a doctorate, you must pay the normal fees required for the program you’re seeking admission to.

Regular and special students

Regular and special students

Regular students are students admitted into a program leading to a degree, certificate or diploma who have enrolled in one or more courses in their program. Regular students might pay a flat fee or by unit, depending on their program or course load.

Special students

A special student is someone allowed to enrol for courses to receive units, but who’s not seeking a degree, certificate or diploma. Special students pay a per-unit fee for part-time studies and a flat fee for full-time studies.

Course load

Tuition fees are based on the number of units you enrol for.

Full time
Undergraduate studies

For a bachelor’s or certificate, you must enrol for at least 12 units per term to be considered full time for tuition fee calculation purposes. Full-time undergraduate students pay a flat tuition fee. There are specific fees for courses you take as an auditor, which are not included in the classification of students. 

Graduate studies

For a master’s, graduate diploma or doctorate, students generally enrol for six units or more and are automatically considered full time for tuition fee calculation purposes. To change your classification, you must complete a Modification/Cancellation of Registration (Graduate Studies) form (PDF) and submit it to your faculty’s graduate studies office by the date indicated in the important academic dates and deadlines.

Full-time students pay a flat fee for most programs. However, some programs, such as the master’s in engineering, calculate fees per unit, regardless of whether you’re full or part time. There are specific fees for courses you take as an auditor, which are not included in the classification of students.

Part time

Part-time students pay a per-unit fee multiplied by the number of units they’re enrolled for. The fee per unit varies according to other criteria, such as your program or status in Canada. For undergraduate studies, part-time fees for non-credit (NC) courses are determined according to the number of hours of formal lectures (or the equivalent) per week.

Research fees

Part-time graduate students conducting research (instead of taking courses) pay a flat fee per term. Learn more about research fees for Canadians residing in Ontario, Canadians residing outside of Ontario and International students.

Financial impact of changing your status (from full time to part time)

If your academic status changes from full to part time, you might no longer be eligible for financial aid or able to renew scholarships or bursaries. As well, withdrawing from a course may affect your ability to meet your program requirements. Make sure you consider all the consequences first.

Status in Canada

Canadian citizens or the equivalent

Fees for Canadian citizens apply to the following students:

  • A. Canadian citizens and permanent residents, and their dependants1
    • Students born outside of Canada must present proof of their status to InfoService to pay Canadian fees. A valid Canadian passport constitutes proof. In most cases, photo ID and a social insurance number not starting with the number 9 are also enough to confirm your legal status. If you’re in the process of receiving permanent residency, we require a letter from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada confirming that it has received your application for permanent residency.
  • B. Members of the diplomatic corps and their dependants1
  • C. Visitors admitted to Canada for work and their dependants2
  • D. Refugees accepted by the Government of Canada and their dependants1,3

Students in categories B, C or D must show their supporting documentation to InfoService to pay Canadian fees.

Notes

  1. The term dependant includes your partner (married or common-law) and your or your partner’s unmarried children. Dependant status must be fully documented.
    • Marriage: A marriage license is required to confirm spousal status.
    • Common law union: A common law union must be confirmed through an affidavit signed by the two partners, as well as by a legal authority (lawyer, notary or commissioner.  This relationship must have lasted at least three years unless the partners live with one or more children of which they are the birth or adoptive parents.
    • Unmarried children: Dependants must be under age 22 and not be in a conjugal relationship (married or common law) when they begin their studies. Unmarried children can also be persons with a disability who have been financially supported substantially by their parents and are unable to be self-supporting because of the disability.
  2. The following persons are excluded from the category “Visitors admitted to Canada for work and their dependants”:
    • Visitors holding a graduate teaching or research assistantship
    • International students with a work permit to complete an internship or medical studies (residents, clinical associates, research associates)
    • International students with a post-graduation work permit (for up to three years after graduation)
    • International students with a valid study permit whose spouse or common law partner has received a work permit for this reason
    • International students with a work permit allowing them to work off campus
  3. Canada only recognizes UN convention refugees after the second phase of the refugee claim assessment. You must present a letter from Citizenship and Immigration Canada confirming that it has received your application for permanent residency.
Province or territory of residence for Canadians

University fees for Canadian citizens or permanent residents vary according to whether or not you reside in Ontario. Ontario residence criteria

Ontario must be the most recent province in which you’ve resided for 12 consecutive months as of your first day of study at the University of Ottawa, not including time as a full-time postsecondary student.

  • For high school students: the province of the last school you attended
  • For all other students: the province of your home address when you apply

If you don’t meet the usual Ontario residency criteria, you might still be considered an Ontario resident based on your particular circumstances. This applies if you’re:

  • Married and Ontario is the most recent province in which your spouse has resided for 12 consecutive months, not including time as a full-time postsecondary student.
  • A single dependent student; to be a dependent student, you must meet all of the following criteria:
    • You have never been married or in a common-law relationship.
    • You have never been a single parent with legal custody of and financial responsibility for children.
    • You’re pursuing postsecondary education within six years of leaving secondary school.
    • You haven’t worked full time for 24 months in a row by the start of your study period.
    • Ontario is the most recent province in which your parents, step-parents or official sponsors have resided for at least 12 consecutive months. If your parents or step-parents are separated or divorced, this residency requirement applies to the parent, step-parent or guardian with whom you normally reside or who financially supports you
  • A student who meets the requirements for status in Canada but not the Ontario residency requirements (or a “stateless Canadian”).
    • If neither you nor your expected contributors have lived in any Canadian province or territory for 12 consecutive months (excluding time as a full-time student), you must provide supporting documentation to determine whether you meet the Ontario residency requirements.
International students

Fees for international students apply to the following persons:

  • E. Persons who don’t belong to categories A, B, C or D
  • F. Persons who, despite belonging to categories A, B, C or D, have not submitted documents supporting their legal status in Canada by the enrolment deadline. If you fail to meet the deadlines, you must pay international student fees. You can’t change your status retroactively. These are the deadlines:
    • Fall term: October 31
    • Winter term: January 31
    • Graduate students enrolled for the Spring-Summer term (May to August): June 30
    • Graduate students enrolled for the Summer term (July to August) and undergraduate students enrolled for the Spring-Summer or Summer terms: July 31

Progress in your program

How far you have progressed in your program can influence your tuition fees for a given term. Your progress is calculated in intervals of roughly one year of studies for a student progressing normally as a full-time student.

Your progress is posted with your statement of account in uoZone in one month before each term.  In the meantime, see this information.

Undergraduate

For undergraduate programs, the total number of units you’ve completed and that you are registered to by the end of a term determines your tuition fees for the term.

There are six tuition brackets for undergraduate programs. For some programs, tuition fees for each bracket are the same, while for others they vary.

Same: Canadian student enrolled in the Faculty of Arts for the Fall 2021 term.

Vary: International student enrolled in Chemical Engineering for the Fall 2021 term.

  • 33 or fewer units = $3,044.08
  • 33.01 to 66 units = $3,044.08
  • 66.01 to 99 units = $3,044.08
  • 99.01 to 132 units = $3,044.08
  • 132.01 to 165 units = $3,044.08
  • 165.01 or more units = $3,044.08

 

  • 33 or fewer units = $26,353.60
  • 33.01 to 66 units = $26,353.60
  • 66.01 to 99 units = $24,176.56
  • 99.01 to 132 units = $22,179.37
  • 132.01 to 165 units = $20,636.46
  • 165.01 or more units = $19,200.88

 

Graduate

For graduate programs, the total number of terms you’ve completed by the end of a term determines your tuition fees for the term.

There are four tuition brackets for graduate programs. For some programs, the fees for each bracket are the same, while for others they vary.

Same: Canadian student enrolled in the Faculty of Arts for the Fall 2021 term.

Vary: International student enrolled in the Faculty of Engineering for the Fall 2021 term.

  • 2 terms or less = $2,456.70
  • 3 to 5 terms = $2,456.70
  • 6 to 8 terms = $2,456.70
  • 9 terms or more = $2,456.70
  • 2 terms or less = $11,290.52
  • 3 to 5 terms = $11,290.52
  • 6 to 8 terms = $10,357.82
  • 9 terms or more = $9,502.18

Note: A student moving from an undergraduate to a graduate program starts at the first bracket.

Calculating your tuition for future years

You can’t use your progress to calculate your tuition for future years. We update these tables every May with the fees for the coming year.

Using the graduate program table above (international student column), you can see here what a 2% tuition increase would mean.

Progression

20XX-20YY

Following year

(2% increase)

2 terms or less

$11,290.52

$11,516.00

3 to 5 terms

$11,290.52

$11,516.00

6 to 8 terms

$10,357.82

$10,564.98

9 terms or more

$9,502.18

$9,692.22

Applying to pay Ontario tuition fees if you've been billed as a non-Ontario resident

If you’ve been billed non-Ontario resident tuition fees but are eligible to pay Ontario resident tuition fees due to your residency status, you can request a tuition fee billing change. Submit your request with the required documentation by the following deadlines:

Term

Deadline

Fall 2022

September 30, 2022

Winter 2023

February 3, 2023

Spring-Summer 2023

TBD

Notes

  • The adjustment will be made during the study period when the fee change has been approved. We don’t make fee changes for prior study periods.
  • No exceptions to these deadlines can be made.

Eligibility for Ontario resident tuition fees

Submit the required documentation based on which of the eligibility scenarios below applies to you by the Fall-Winter or Summer term deadline.

You’re a dependent student and your parent’s primary residence is in Ontario

Required documentation:

1. Your parent’s most recent Notice of Assessment confirming residency in Ontario and proof of dependent relationship.

OR

2. (a) Proof of dependent relationship AND (b) your parent’s property tax bill or residential lease agreement AND (c) one of the following documents from your parents:

  • Utility bill (e.g., hydro, gas, water, cable, cellphone)
  • Valid provincially-issued photo identification (e.g., Ontario driver’s licence, Ontario Photo Card)
  • Child Tax Benefit statement
  • Home insurance policy
  • Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid (T4E)
  • Statement of Old Age Security (T4A) (OAS) or Statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits (T4A) (P)
  • Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contributions
  • Employment confirmation (e.g., pay stub or letter from employer)

Suggested supporting documentation demonstrating the dependent relationship between you and your parents: 

  • A Canadian long-form birth certificate with parental information
  • A foreign birth certificate officially translated into English or French with parental information
  • Parent’s Record of Landing document (IMM1000/IMM5292/IMM5688) with list of accompanying family members
  • Parent’s Confirmation of Permanent Residence visa with list of accompanying family members
  • Notice of Decision from the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada with list of accompanying family members
  • Proof of adoption documents with parental information

Notes: Documents demonstrating the dependent relationship with your parents must include your full legal name. The name(s) and address on the property tax statement or lease agreement requested in 2(b) must match the documents provided to meet the 2(c) requirements.

As a dependent student, you don’t have to live with your parents during your study period.

You’re an independent student, your primary residence is in Ontario, and Ontario is the last province you’ve lived in for 12 consecutive months prior to being a postsecondary student

Required documentation:

1. Your most recent Notice of Assessment confirming residency in Ontario.

OR

  1. (a) Your property tax bill or residential lease agreement covering the last 12 months prior to being a postsecondary student AND (b) any one of the following documents:
  • Utility bill (e.g., hydro, gas, water, cable, cellphone)
  • Valid provincially-issued photo identification (e.g., Ontario driver’s licence,Ontario Photo Card)
  • Child Tax Benefit statement
  • Home insurance policy
  • Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid (T4E)
  • Statement of Old Age Security (T4A) (OAS) or Statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits (T4A) (P)
  • Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contributions
  • Employment confirmation (e.g., pay stub or letter from employer)

Notes: Your name and address on the property tax statement or lease agreement requested in 2(a) must match the document provided to meet the 2(b) requirements.

You’re an independent student, your spouse or common law partner’s primary residence is in Ontario and Ontario is the last province your spouse or common law partner has lived in for 12 consecutive months in a row

Required documentation:

  1. (a) Proof of marriage or proof of common law status for a period of three years

Suggested supporting documentation: a Canadian marriage certificate or foreign marriage certificate translated into English, declaration of a common law union (IMM 5409), a notarized affidavit of common law status, any one document with both partners’ or spouses’ names providing evidence of co-habitation for the last three years, such as a tax statement, mortgage statement, property tax bill or lease agreement.   

OR

  1. (b) Proof of cohabitation for any period and proof of dependent children (natural or adoptive) 

Suggested supporting documentation: proof of a dependent child AND any one document with both spouses’ or partners’ names providing evidence of cohabitation, such as a tax statement, mortgage statement, property tax bill or lease agreement.

AND

  1. Your spouse’s or partner’s most recent Notice of Assessment confirming residency in Ontario.

OR

  1. (a) Your spouse’s or partner’s property tax bill or residential lease agreement covering the last 12 months AND (b) any one of the following documents (re-use any applicable documents from 1(a) and 1(b):
  • Utility bill (e.g., hydro, gas, water, cable, cellphone)
  • Valid provincially-issued photo identification (e.g., Ontario driver’s licence,Ontario Photo Card)
  • Child Tax Benefit statement
  • Home insurance policy
  • Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid (T4E)
  • Statement of Old Age Security (T4A) (OAS) or Statement of Canada PensionPlan Benefits (T4A) (P)
  • Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contributions
  • Employment confirmation (e.g., pay stub or letter from employer)

Notes: Documents demonstrating marriage or a common law relationship must include your full legal name. Your spouse’s or partner’s name and address on the property tax statement or lease agreement requested in 3(a) must match the document provided to satisfy 3(b).

You’ve been approved for permanent residency through the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP)

Required documentation:

  1. A Confirmation of Nomination letter from the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration attesting to your participation in the program.
  2. Proof of Permanent Resident (PR) status or approval in principle status (AIP) such as a valid PR card, Confirmation of Permanent Residence visa, approval in principle letter or acknowledgement of receipt letter from the IRCC.

Notes: To qualify as an Ontario resident for tuition fee purposes, you must be a permanent resident or, if you’re awaiting approval of your permanent resident status and are in Canada on a study visa, you must have had an international fee exemption approved by the Office of the Registrar through InfoService.

You’re receiving or are eligible to receive provincial funding from the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) in the current academic year OR you received or were eligible for OSAP funding in a previous year and have not had a break in enrolment

Required documentation:

The University will determine your OSAP funding status. There’s no need to submit documentation to prove you meet this requirement.

Definitions

To help you determine if you fit one of the eligibility scenarios above, here’s a list of definitions. They should help you understand Ontario resident tuition billing. However, they don’t show whether you’re eligible for other University of Ottawa services.

Parent

“Parent” or “parents” refers to one or both birth parents, adoptive parents, step-parents, legal guardians or official sponsors.

Approved in Principle (AIP) and Acknowledgement of Receipt (AOR)

According to the Government of Canada glossary, permanent residence applicants have been “approved in principle” when they’ve received a letter from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) stating that they meet the permanent residence eligibility requirements, but they have to pass the medical, security and background checks. Students can present their Approval in Principle or official Acknowledgment of Receipt letter as proof of this status.

Independent student

You’re an independent student if one of the following is true:

  • You’re married or in a common law relationship
  • You’re a parent
  • You’ve been out of high school for six years or more at the start of your study period
  • You’ve worked full time for at least 24 months in a row
  • Both your parents are deceased

Dependent student

You’re a dependent student if all of the following are true:

  • You’re not married or in a common-law relationship
  • You’re not separated, divorced or widowed
  • You’re not a parent
  • You’ve been out of high school for less than six years before the start of your study period
  • You haven’t worked full time for at least 24 months in a row

Common-law relationship

As defined by the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP), you are living in a common-law relationship if you and your spouse:

  • have cohabitated continuously for a period of at least three years or;
  • are in a relationship of some permanence and are the natural or adoptive parents of a child.

Requesting Ontario resident tuition fee billing

  • To request Ontario resident tuition fee billing, complete and submit the form along with the required documentation.
  • If your request is approved, your enrolment records will be revised to show you’re billed Ontario resident tuition fees.
  • We’ll send our decision on your request to your @uOttawa.ca email address.
Ancillary Fees

Ancillary fees are added to tuition fees when calculating university fees. They’re mandatory fees that cover services beyond your program of study. See the list of ancillary fees. Ancillary fees are non-refundable after the period for full refunds ends. This date is published on the Important dates and deadlines website.

Health

Current ancillary fees were set by the University to provide students with access to health services that suit their circumstances and lifestyles. They’re charged to both full- and part-time students, at all levels of study. Ancillary fees are adjusted each year based on the consumer price index.

Revenues from these fees fund a wide range of health services on campus (such as family medicine, a drop-in clinic with extended hours, immunization required for programs of study and internships, mental health services, sports medicine services and other specialized medical care). They also fund a health promotion program that provides you with information and education on nutrition, stress reduction, mental health, sexual health, drug and alcohol issues, and more. 

Sports

Current sports services ancillary fees were established through a 2001 student referendum. They fund sports facilities, such as fitness centres and playing fields, along with sports activities (like group classes), that students enjoy. They also fund initiatives proposed and approved by the School Spirit Council, made up of members representing the University, the GSAÉD and the UOSU.

Fees are charged to both full- and part-time students, at all levels of study. They are adjusted each year based on the consumer price index. Revenues from these fees go to administer, operate and maintain campus sports facilities, as well as sports programming. 

U-Pass

This fee was established through a uOttawa student referendum held in 2016, to provide affordable transportation to all students. The U-Pass allows you to use public transit provided by OC Transpo and the STO (Société de transport de l’Outaouais).

The U-Pass program is governed by an agreement among the University of Ottawa, the City of Ottawa, the UOSU and the GSAÉD. The U-Pass fee is set under this agreement, which only covers the cost of public transit. These fees are mandatory for full-time University of Ottawa students (with some exceptions), to keep the U-Pass as inexpensive as possible.

University Centre

This fee was established through a 1966 student referendum, to offer social, recreational and cultural activities that improve the quality of university life. It’s charged to all full- and part-time students, at all levels of study, and has been indexed to the consumer price index. Use of revenue from this fee is overseen by an advisory committee with members representing students, the UOSO, the GSÉAD and the University.

The UCU houses the legislative, executive and administrative branches of the student union and provides space for student clubs, societies and associations, and their activities. Its expenses include UCU administration, operation and maintenance, student wellness programs such as the multi-faith space, services for nursing mothers, the Carrefour francophone, the Women’s Resource Centre and activities that enhance the student experience. 

Telfer School of Management Career Centre

This ancillary fee was established through a Telfer School of Management student referendum in the early 2000’s. It provides students with professional and personal support services, such as career counselling and coaching, CV critiques, aptitude test (e.g., MBTI) administration and scoring, networking events, job fairs and career information sessions.

The fee is mandatory for Telfer bachelor’s and MBA students, since it helps the school meet AACSB, AQUIS and AMBA accreditation requirements, as well as industry career preparation requirements.  Revenues from this fee pay for events, trips and special programs, test administrative and assessment fees, staff compensation, software and student initiatives. 

University of Ottawa Students’ Union (UOSU)

Learn about services covered by the UOSU ancillary fee.

Graduate Students’ Association (GSAÉD)

Learn about services covered by the GSAÉD ancillary fee.

Administrative fees

Administrative fees are charged for services offered on request. This includes applications for admission, as well as requests for a copy of a diploma or to participate in the CO-OP or uOGlobal programs. 

Payment of fees

Your tuition and ancillary fees depend on your program, your legal status in Canada and the number of units you’re enrolled for. You must pay your university fees by the dates indicated in the important academic dates and deadlines.

Your statement of account shows the official status of your account at uOttawa at that moment. It is updated regularly. To access it, log into uoZone, select Applications and then Statement of account.

Fees for student services and UOSU services, as well as incidental fees, are payable each term.

Administrative fees are payable when you receive a service.

U-Pass and student services

Your U-Pass fees for the year are payable along with your Fall term university fees. U-Pass fees for the Spring-Summer term are payable with your Spring-Summer term university fees.

Course withdrawal

If you decide to drop a course after your course selection has been approved, you must make the necessary changes in your Student Center by the deadline (see the important academic dates and deadlines). Log into uoZone. Select Applications, Enrol and then Drop, and follow the instructions. If you don’t follow this procedure, you will receive an ABS mention (equivalent to an F grade). The usual regulations concerning payment of tuition fees apply.

Learn more about dropping a course.

Opting out of the U-Pass and group insurance

You can opt out of the U-Pass and group insurance under certain conditions. Learn about U-Pass exemptions and health and dental insurance exemptions.

University fee changes for 2022–2023

Starting in fall 2022, the following changes will apply to university fees.

For all students

Most incidental, ancillary and administrative fees will increase according to the consumer price index, at a rate of 2.4%.

For Canadian students

Starting in the Fall 2022 term, the University will apply differential tuition fees for students residing in and outside Ontario, respectively.

  • Tuition fees for Canadian students residing in Ontario will remain unchanged for the coming academic year.
  • Tuition fees for Canadian students residing outside Ontario will increase by 5% over 2021–2022 fees.

For international students

Tuition fees for international students will increase by 5.5% to 7%.

In general:

  • International students enrolling in first year will pay tuition fees about 7% higher than in 2021–2022.
  • International students returning to the University will pay tuition fees about 5.5% higher than what they paid in 2021–2022.

We took several criteria and rules into account in setting the 2022–2023 tuition fees. To know which fees apply to your situation and program of study, see the detailed tuition fee tables (first select the category you belong to).

International students who started their studies prior to fall 2021 and can receive a differential tuition fee exemption allowing them to pay Canadian tuition fees will now pay the fees that apply to Canadians residing outside Ontario.

Please read the new “Explanation of annual tuition fee increase” section below closely, as well as the “Factors that influence tuition fees” section.

More on annual university fee increases

Tuition fees are approved each year by the University, usually in May or June, and come into effect in September.

  • The province of Ontario regulates changes to Canadians’ tuition fees for universities in the province, whether they’re in Ontario or elsewhere in the country. This framework sets out the maximum increases allowed and the rules for applying them, which can vary depending on several criteria.  
  • For international students, the University has the power to determine tuition fees, increases and the rules to apply them. Given this, to allow you to predict your tuition fees for the duration of your studies, the University adopted a tuition fee predictability commitment, which limits increases for returning students.

Here are two of many possible situations showing how tuition fees can increase in different ways and by different percentages from one year to the next.

Table 1: Hypothetical increase of 5% by level for new students and 2% for returning students

In this example, tuition fees for each level of progress through a program of study are calculated based on the amount for the equivalent level the previous year (A is based on A the previous year, B on B, etc.).

Progress

Note: For details on progress, see the “Factors affecting tuition fees” section above.

Tuition per term

Increase by level

Tuition per term the following year

33 or fewer units (around 11 or fewer courses)

(A) CA$3,500

(A) + 5%

CA$3,675

33.01 to 66 units (around 12 to 22 courses)

(B) CA$$3,400

(B) + 2%

CA$3,468

66.01 to 99 units (around 23 to 33 courses)

 (C) CA$3,300

(C) + 2%

CA$3,366

99.01 to 132 units (around 34 to 44 courses)

(D) CA$3,200

(D) + 2%

CA$3,264

132.01 to 165 units (around 45 to 55 courses)

(E) CA$3,100

(E) + 2%

CA$3,162

165.01 or more units (around 56 or more courses)

(F) CA$3,000

(F) + 2%

CA$3,060

 

Table 2: Hypothetical increase of 5% by cohort for new students and 2% for returning students

In this example, starting with 33.01 units, tuition fees associated with each level of progress in your program of study are calculated based on the prior level for the previous year (B is based on A for the previous year, C on B, etc.).

 

Progress

Note: For details on progress, see the “Factors affecting tuition fees” section above.

Tuition per term

Increase by cohort

Tuition per term the following year

33 or fewer units (around 11 or fewer courses)

(A) CA$3,500

(A) + 5%

CA$3,675

33.01 to 66 units (around 12 to 22 courses)

(B) CA$3,400

(A) + 2%

CA$3,570

66.01 to 99 units (around 23 to 33 courses)

(C) CA$3,300

(B) + 2%

CA$3,366

99.01 to 132 units (around 34 to 44 courses)

(D) CA$3,200

(C) + 2%

CA$3,264

132.01 to 165 units (around 45 to 55 courses)

(E) CA$3,100

(D) + 2%

CA$3,162

165.01 or more units (around 56 or more courses)

(F) CA$3,000

(E) + 2%

CA$3,060

 

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