School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

The School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) was formed in 1997 by the merger of the Department of Computer Science and of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The School of EECS is the University of Ottawa’s centre for research and teaching in all areas related to computing, computers and communications.

Electrical engineering material.

About the school

The School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers a vibrant research environment where the traditional disciplines of electronics, computer and software engineering and computer science come together to create unique synergy.

Cybersecurity
Guy-Vincent Jourdan
Cybersecurity

Preventing cybercrime before it happens

Professor Guy-Vincent Jourdan approaches cybercrime defence from a "zero-victim" standpoint: he looks for ways to detect cyber-attacks as soon as they…
Cybersecurity
Paria Shirani
Cybersecurity

Protecting the Internet of Things from cyber attacks

Professor Paria Shirani is analyzing vulnerabilities within digitally connected smart devices and developing security measures against debilitating cy…
Cybersecurity
Carlisle Adams
Cybersecurity

Designing encryption technology to secure the future

New technologies are needed to keep encryption efficient and secure in the face of cyber threats in a new age of quantum computing.

Programs

Undergraduate programs

Graduate programs

Research

Department research areas

With over 70 researchers and over 750 graduate students working in many laboratories and groups, the School of EECS has built strong connections with local industry which results in a dynamic environment of collaboration and practical impact.

Opportunities for joint research exist at all levels, from exploratory research to contract research, from sponsoring a student to supporting a dedicated project, and many variations in between. University-based research can be very cost-effective for your company and in most cases your support can be used to leverage additional grants from government agencies resulting in a multiplying effect.

Research groups and chairs